Rippert Flute

Rippert flute by Stefan Beck - Photo: Michael Dollendorf
Model: 
Jean-Jacques Rippert, Paris, fl. 1696-1716

This flute by Rippert is today in the Engadin-Museum (Inv.Nr. 1645) St. Moritz, Switzerland. Others are in Glasgow and in Paris. Their common feature is a powerful and clear sound. Rippert (and also Bressan) use a bore less conical than Hotteterre or Naust to get a strong first octave but also the high end to top a''' is very easy.

The St. Moritz flute is at Paris chamber pitch (398/400 Hz), the one in Glasgow is at 405 Hz, closer to the English pitch standard.

The original has the most exquisite ivory turnings, whose reproductions would cost as much as 4 or 5 flutes. The copy has more simple but also quite beautiful parts.

For pre-1720 music the Beck-Rippert is my favorite instrument, easy to play over the entire range and an instrument that offers a wide palette of colors. Stefan likes to experiment with other woods than boxwood. The first Rippert I tried belongs to another client and was made from lilac, unfortunately in very short supply. Mine he made from a very beautiful piece of very old olive that had been resting on the top shelf of his shop for over 30 years.

The powerful sound makes it very suitable for ensembles with violins, viols, lutes and harpsichord. All French chamber music but also the wonderful works from Bach's Köthen years sound fantastic on this flute.

Rippert flute by Stefan Beck - Photo: Michael Dollendorf
Rippert flute by Stefan Beck - Photo: Michael Dollendorf
Rippert flute by Stefan Beck - Photo: Michael Dollendorf